Monday, May 25, 2020

Achieving Success With The Arts - 3446 Words

Achieving Success with the Arts Sabrina M. Gemmer Professor Bernard Jefferson Community Technical College The Arts and Us Different forms of art have been around since the beginning of time. Art, comes from a cultures specific way of life that has been passed down from generations. Art helps mold people into creative individuals. It helps people stand out, be their own person, and increase their imagination. Art surrounds us from the time we are young children to adults. As a young child, the song your parent may use to sing you to sleep is a form of an art. The building blocks you played with in kindergarten are a form of art. The dance you preformed for your cheerleading squad in high school is an art. Art helps us learn†¦show more content†¦The art programs contribute towards helping a student learn more successfully in the classroom and prepare them for adulthood. Without these programs children will not receive the full artistic and creative experience that will help them succeed as adults. Art education should be kept in schools because they benefit students in an academic setting, teachi ng then study patterns, helping promote creativity and growing into successful adults. Not Making the Cut Art Education Programs may not bring in enough money to help provide the programs with new supplies and equipment. Even though there may be a shortage of money, the students should be able to vote which program goes. The shortage of money made by art programs may have caused schools to become annoyed with having to pay for new equipment yearly. Many schools believe that by cutting arts programs money could be used for something else more important. An art show may cost $3 to attend and only 10 people may show up. A sports event may cost $3 to attend, but more than half the school attends, including parents, sports fans and coaches. In an online article, Arsenault (2009) concludes that It s fair to generalize that athletics last longer. They are universally recognized as representative of the school and generate revenue. We have had schools that have totally cut athletic programs, although those tend to be the last things on the chopping block because of sports

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Affirmative Action Curbed in California Essay - 980 Words

LOS ANGELES, JUNE 1 – California Gov. Pete Wilson (R), vowing to lead a growing conservative movement to end three decades of racial and gender preferences as an antidote to discrimination, today signed an executive order abolishing a wide range of affirmative action programs affecting hiring and contracting in state agencies. Wilson, who is seeking the Republican presidential nomination, eliminated or sharply cut back scores of affirmative action policies or programs that are not mandated by state or federal laws or that exceed those laws. He also abolished 118 boards and commissions created to advise state agencies on ethnic and gender diversity issues. Although he has no direct authority to order policy changes for public†¦show more content†¦By itself, it doesnt complete the change we must make. Special preferences remain embedded in state and federal law. I vow to fight for changes in those laws,quot; Wilson said. Sean Walsh, the governors press secretary, said Wilson is the first governor to roll back affirmative action programs. He said the order would affect all of the states approximately 150,000 full-time job positions. According to the California State Employees Association, about 60 percent of the state government work force is white, 16 percent Hispanic, 12 percent black, 6 percent are Asian and the remaining 6 percent from other groups. Wilsons action appeared designed to capitalize on public dissatisfaction with minority preference programs and on a backlash against what is characterized as quot;reverse discrimination,quot; while at the same time setting him apart from the eight other contenders for the GOP presidential nomination, none of whom are sitting governors. It comes a day after senior White House officials said President Clinton is still weeks or even months away from completing a review he has ordered of federal affirmative action programs. Wilson already had announced his support of a proposed 1996 state ballot initiative that would go further than todays order by abolishing affirmative action in all state hiring, contracting and university admissions practices. At least six other states –Show MoreRelatedEssay about History: World War I and Bold Experiments7600 Words   |  31 Pageswho became part of the war effort Broward Practice Questions F 127 13. The battle in the Senate over the Treaty of Versailles centered around Article x, which was (a) a section of the league of Nations’ covenant that called for military action (b) a plan for reparation payments (c) a proposal for the creation of new nations in Europe and the Middle East (d) an international army (e) a new map of Europe 14. A major impact of advertising and mass media in the 1920s and later was the (a) standardizationRead MoreStrategy Safari by Mintzberg71628 Words   |  287 Pagesdifferent schools about it) requires a number of definitions, five in particular (based on Mintzberg, 1987). Ask someone to define strategy and you will likely be told that strategy is a plan, or something equivalent—a direction, a guide or course of action into the future, a path to get from here to there. Then ask that person to describe the strategy that his or her own organization or that of a competitor actually pursued over the past five years—not what they inte nded to do but what they really did

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Love and Marriage in Renaissance Literature - 1228 Words

In medieval Europe, the troubadours (poets of the southern part of France), like Guilhem IX, or Cercamon, first began to write poems about humble men falling in love with women who were admirer and adored by their lovers. Furthermore, intense love between men and women became a central subject in European literature, like between Tristan and Iseult, Lancelot and Guinevere, or Aeneas and Dido. But it was not question of marriage. Actually, marriage and love did not match very well together but then Renaissance literature developed the concepts of love and marriage and recorded the evolution of the relation between them. In the Renaissance poetry, Donne, in The Good Morrow, celebrate love and sexuality in marriage. However, the aspects of†¦show more content†¦In Shakespeare s play entitled A Midsummer Nights Dream, in the couples, the mates were chosen on their own will. Theseus, at the beginning of the play, is talking with his wife, Hippolyta, about their upcoming marriage. He so, demonstrates that the marriage was not a forced duty but that he wants it and even Hippolyta shows her happiness to marry him. Shakespeare went against societal norms and showed love as the only desire of a couple. And this began his central and favourite theme: the lovers who cannot be together because that goes against their families will. Besides, the societal norms of the marriage were quite strict in regard to the church. Indeed, before a couple could officially be considered married by the church and common law, there were four basic requirements. First, the bride s family had to consent and a dowry had to be offered. Second, both parties had to be of equal social class. The third requirement was for the parties to publicly declare the wedding and to have witnesses. Finally, the couple had to consummate the marriage. In Shakespeare s Measure for Measure, Claudio and Juliet are, thus married by common law standards -- however, their marriage was secret and so, not consi dered as a legal marriage. Actually, it was very important that the marriage was witnessed. And in this play,Show MoreRelatedLove and Marriage in Renaissance Literature Essay973 Words   |  4 PagesLove and Marriage in Renaissance Literature In medieval Europe, the troubadours (poets of the southern part of France), like Guilhem IX, or Cercamon, first began to write poems about humble men falling in love with women who were admirer and adored by their lovers. Furthermore, intense love between men and women became a central subject in European literature, like between Tristan and Iseult, Lancelot and Guinevere, or Aeneas and Dido. But it was not question of marriageRead MoreThe Reflection of Life During the Renaissance in Literature1601 Words   |  7 PagesLife in the Renaissance has been greatly reflected through the literature of its time. Many authors from this time reflected life in the Renaissance through their works. Several authors who strongly demonstrated this reflection include William Shakespeare, Thomas Elyot, Christopher Marlowe, Walter Raleigh, and Christine de Pizan. They accomplished this by producing various literary works, such as Hamlet, â€Å"The Passionate Shepherd to His Love,† â€Å"The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd,† Le Livre de laRead MoreEssay on Attitudes Toward Love in French literature838 Words   |  4 PagesThroughout the centuries, literature has provided a way to express oneself, while at the same time, allowing the reader to experience a different kind of life through the stories. As a creation of humans, literature tends to reflect the ideals and though ts of its writer, while also providing a glimpse into the society, in which the writer penned the story. Perhaps one of the greatest and most intriguing human emotions is love and this theme is present in literature from its beginning to the presentRead MoreClass And Social Structures During The Medieval Period993 Words   |  4 PagesClass and social structures changed frequently throughout the medieval period, the renaissance, and the eighteenth century, and this change caused much anxiety in preserving the noble class. During the medieval period, the three classes were challenged by the emergence of the merchant class which rose to the same level as the nobles during the renaissance. Finally, in the eighteenth century, this noble class was pushed out of power and then returned, throwing the class into turmoil. These changesRead MoreHarlem Renaissance Essay1106 Words   |  5 PagesCollege in 1917 where she began her literary career. Hurston was closely associated with the Harle m Renaissance being one of the pre-eminent writers on the twentieth century in African American literature. Her famous novel â€Å"Their Eyes Were Watching God† was especially influential to the movement on racial equality at the time. Her Novel both reflects and departs from the ideas on the Harlem Renaissance in several ways. In order to understand the significance of Author Zora Neale Hurston’s novel â€Å"TheirRead More Comparing Love and Marriage in Canterbury Tales, Lanval, Faerie Queene, and Monsieurs Departure675 Words   |  3 PagesLove and Marriage in Canterbury Tales, Lanval, Faerie Queene, and Monsieurs Departure Medieval and Renaissance literature develops the concepts of love and marriage and records the evolution of the relation between them. In Chaucers Canterbury Tales, Christian love clashes with courtly love, as men and women grapple with such issues as which partner should rule in marriage, the proper, acceptable role of sex in marriage, and the importance of love as a basis for a successful marriage. WorksRead MoreThe Harlem Renaissance1317 Words   |  6 Pagesis the Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance is the cultural movement of the 1920’s. The movement essentially kindled a new black cultural identity through art, literature and intellect. The Harlem Renaissance started during the Roaring Twenties. It took place in Harlem, New York. It became most prominent in the mid to late 1920’s and it diminished toward the early 1930’s (Henderson). The Harlem Renaissance was initially called the New Negro Movement or the New Negro Renaissance. It was the resultRead MoreGender Equality During the Renaissance Essay1198 Words   |  5 PagesThe Renaissance was simply â€Å"the green end of one of civilizations hardest winters† (Robert 10). In other words, catastrophic events swept through Europe such as the black plague, warfare, and starvation causing a high population of death rates. After an era of destitution, the Renaissance was a period of â€Å"rebirth† where individuals could express their intellectual thought through art, science, literature, and education. It’s true that people during that time express humanist ideals of individualRead MoreThe Essay Of Groom Service And The Return 803 Wo rds   |  4 Pagesare two short story which have the common theme of â€Å"love† and the common situation of â€Å" the marriage†. Although the two stories have common themes and situation related to acceptance, acknowledgement, and recognition, the difference between the two story influence the meaning a lot. The common theme of story is â€Å"love†. The protagonist in â€Å"Groom Service†, Bernard, had the ability to survive with his hunting skill, but did not dare to seek his own love. He seeks acceptance from Marie and her family. OnRead MoreDifferences Of Shakespeare And Much Ado About Nothing By William Shakespeare1668 Words   |  7 PagesShakespeare is regarded as a very influential writer in British literature and has been an inspiration for literature beyond his time. This play has been recreated for the cinema in many versions of film. One version of film in particular is by the director Kenneth Branagh in 1993 (IMDb). Both the Much Ado About Nothing play and the Much Ado About Nothing film have differences, updates, and similarities that relates back to Renaissance time or to current 21st century culture. The original text that

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

The Veldt by Ray Bradbury Veldt Essay Example For Students

The Veldt by Ray Bradbury Veldt Essay The Veldt by Ray Bradbury The story of The Veldt, is a delving into the issue of how modern technology can destroy the nuclear family. The editor of the Encounters book, John A. Rothermich comments that This story is almost devoid of characterization., I agree with this statement and think it is key to the plot of the story. The story begins with the mother of the family, who has quite a generic name. We are given no information of the characters background and how they came to the point in time they are now. The lines Happylife Home and the familiar room settings like the parents bedroom and the nursery give you a sense that this is a typical suburban home of the time. The mother seems alarmed or confused about something, the nursery is different now than it was, this at first might lead you to believe the mother has true individual characteristics. However, when you read on, you see the stereotyped reactions to every situation that comes about, the parents then say nothings too good for our children. Later in the story the parents discuss the problems of the incredible house and nursery, The house is wife, mother, and nursemaid, Can I compete with it?, and the father has a generic answer But I thought thats why we bought this house. The parents in the story look upon their childrens needs as services instead of ways of expressing any love or care. In the story we never learn anything about the children except for their obsession with the nursery, I dont want to do anything but look and listen and smell; what else is there to do?. When the parents tell the children the idea of shutting down the computerized house for a vacation, the children react shocked and stay with their one, single characteristic given, they act shocked Who will fry my eggs for me, or darn my socks?. You see then the childrens primary relationship is to the house and not the parents, the children exclaim I wish you were dead!. And sure enough, by the end of the story the children act on their on characteristic. This short story was published in the early 1950s, Using a major issue of the time. Ray Bradbury was trying to make a specific point about the dangers of the new directions of our society, Television was becoming a baby sitter to children in many homes. Busy parents were replacing their own affection and time for their children, with the goggle box. The story concentrates on how this relationship can eventually destroy the family, even in a future society. In order to do this, Mr. Bradbury concentrates on his point and reduces the characters into universal generic people.

Saturday, April 11, 2020

The Concept of Normality In Relation To Eating Disorders

Normality is a concept that can be understood in different perspectives. Sociologically speaking, normality can be differentiated from the norm which refers to the acceptable behaviors in a society. Normality refers to the adherence to the acceptable standards set by a society. Normality is closely guarded by the social constructions of a particular society in the sense that what is considered normal is determined by the forces of the society.Advertising We will write a custom assessment sample on The Concept of Normality In Relation To Eating Disorders specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More This means that what is normal in one society may not be necessarily normal in another (Smolak, Levine Striegel-Moore, 1996). Therefore, issues of eating disorders can be understood from a social cultural perspective as the culture of a specific society determines its eating patterns, thus, influencing the possibility of either the existence or oth erwise of an eating disorders. This paper examines how the understanding of the concept of normality in the society affects conditions of the existence or otherwise of an eating disorder. The whole concept of eating disorders can be explained through the sociological understanding of the concept of normality. Among the dominant sociological understanding of normality that will be used to argue through the concept of eating disorders in this paper are the views such as; what is considered normal can be differentiated from the abnormal even if it may not be the norm, what is normal is a social construct that is imposed by the society, people struggle to fit to the ideals that are set by the society which may affect their eating patterns and lastly, how social change has contributed to the existence of eating disorders. Normality can be defined differently by different people since different things are normal in some communities and abnormal in others. However, different aspects of nor mal behavior can be used to indicate normality (Weiten 2010). However, this view is still directly regulated by the cultural belief of the society. The agents of socialization can be used to express the concept of normality in a number of ways. People grow in a structured society that determines what is normal against what is abnormal. The set standard influences the behavior of a person in all cultural facets as they determine what will be adopted against what will be transgressed. Eating patterns being a culturally controlled concept’s and directly affected by the cultures that exists in a specific society. According to Treasure, Schmidt and Furth, (2005), human beings evaluate their standards in the society based on specific societal standards. This means that a specific society has what it considers ideal as well as what it considers abnormal. These social standards run across a spectrum of measurements that affect all facets of culture. In such cases, there is what is co nsidered normal eating patterns. A good example of how societal ideals can influence the eating disorders can be the explanation of the importance that is placed on the concept of body size. According to Taylor and Muller, (1995), all members of the society should strive to ensure that they conform to the â€Å"normal† standards of their society.Advertising Looking for assessment on social sciences? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Despite the fact that bodies have genetic differences that determines their shape and size, the need to strive to conform to the ideal body size forces many members of the society, especially women to adopt to specific eating habits that may characterize certain disorders (Sheridan, 2007). Another issue that is of paramount importance in understanding the concept of normality in regard to eating disorders is that normality or abnormality is a social construct (Morgan Bhugra, 2010). There are no universal standard to define what is normal or abnormal. Each culture has its own conceptualization of normality and abnormality, which makes something to be normal in one culture and abnormal in another. Similarly, the conceptualization of eating disorders varies from one society to the other as there are no strict universal disorders that run across the spectrum of societies. It is also evident that there are disorders that are associated with specific cultural basis due to the regionalization of specific food to specific regions (Wonderlich, Walsh and Mitchell, 2011). Normality as a social construct can be used to explain some eating disorders, especially those associated with teenagers. As noted by Hales, Yudofsky and Gabbard, (2008), teenage girls have a misconceived concept of ideal body shape and size where being extremely thin regardless of the means towards this course is seen as fashionable and ideal. The notion held by these teenage girls has forced most of them to del iberately avoid eating or to induce vomiting (Bloomfield, 2006). This behavior has led many teenage girls to adopt risky health paths in pursuit of what they conceive to be normal. Beside the identified issue that deals with teenage girls, the other group that is greatly affected by the societal constructs is that of the entire female gender where women may be classified as overweight while their male counterparts may pass without acquiring the label of being overweight, even when they are overweight in the real sense. Thus, more women will strive to conform to the society’s ideal size, a fact that has contributed to various forms of eating disorders. This shows that the concept of what is seen as normal or abnormal towards eating disorders does not necessarily need to be actually healthy, but a construct of the society (Harper-Giuffre and MacKenzie, 1992). Media as an agent of socialization has a lot of influence to the menace of eating disorders. As noted by Sheridan, (2007 ), the media plays a significant role in determining what the ideal body size is especially for women. These ideas that are transferred to the masses through commercials and other programs in the media influences the perception of people towards certain body sizes where contemporary cultures have viewed the slim bodies as the ideal ones.Advertising We will write a custom assessment sample on The Concept of Normality In Relation To Eating Disorders specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More However, when this issue is juxtaposed with the commercials of food known to have high fat content such as fast food products and ice creams, the perception of healthy eating among the members of a population get distorted which forces majority of the people to indulge in unhealthy eating habits as they are â€Å"normalized† by the media. Social change is another aspect that affects or understanding of normality. In most contemporary societies, co nsumption of fast food is considered normal today than it was considered five decades ago (Gentile, 2006). The changing social forces such as the rise of the consumerism culture have led to the rise of the number of people who consume fast foods as well as other readymade meals offered in fast food restaurant. Although many people may have the notion of how unhealthy the fast foods may be to their health, they continue consuming them as the consumption of these products is seen as â€Å"normal† in the society. This means that the society understands that eating fast food is a normal issue, a fact that contributes to the current eating disorders. In conclusion, it is evident that the sociological understanding of the concept of normality can be used to explain various eating disorders. The paper has managed to explain the views of eating disorders in three perspectives, which are the perception of what is normal versus what is abnormal, normality as a construct of the society and finally, personal understanding of normality and eating disorders and how this personal understanding affects people’s conceptualization of their conditions. Reference List Bloomfield, S. 2006. Eating Disorders: Helping Your Child Recover. Oklahoma. Beat Publishers. Gentile, K. 2006. Creating bodies: eating disorders as self-destructive survival New York: RoutledgeAdvertising Looking for assessment on social sciences? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Hales, R, E. Yudofsky S, C. Gabbard, G, O. 2008. The American Psychiatric Publishing textbook of psychiatry. New York: American Psychiatric Publications Harper-Giuffre, H. MacKenzie, K., R. 1992. Group psychotherapy for eating disorders Carlifornia: American Psychiatric Pubbications Morgan, C. and Bhugra, D. 2010. Principles of Social Psychiatry. New York: John Wiley and Sons. Sheridan, K., E. 2007. Eating disorders as a case study of cultural maladaptation. California: American Psychiatric Publications. Shils M. and Shike, M. 2006. Modern nutrition in health and disease. Chicago: Lippincott Williams Wilkins Smolak, L., P., Levine, M. and Striegel-Moore, R. 1996. The developmental psychopathology of eating disorders: implications for research, prevention, and treatment. New York: Routledge, Taylor, J., and Muller, D., J.1995. Nursing adolescents: research and psychological perspectives. London. Wiley-Blackwell. Treasure, J., Schmidt, U. and Furth, E. 2005. The essential handbook o f eating disorders New York: John Wiley and Sons. Weiten, W. 2010. Psychology: Themes and Variations. Upper Saddle River: Cengage Learning. Wonderlich, S. A., Walsh, T. and Mitchell, J. E. 2011. Developing an Evidence-Based Classification of Eating Disorders: Scientific Findings for DSM-5. California: American Psychiatric Publications. This assessment on The Concept of Normality In Relation To Eating Disorders was written and submitted by user Derr1ck to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Free Essays on Trace Of Evidence

Trace of Evidence This article I chose was â€Å"Trace of Evidence† that was found on www.courttv.com. This article was about a serial killing taken place from 1979 to 1981 in Atlanta Georgia. Around the time of the killings, there had been found youths, more than 25 black men, some females and some as young as nine years old. They had all been strangled, bludgeoned, or asphyxiated. After police discovered these gruesome bodies they noticed that the only real clue the could notice was some kind of fiber threads and a few bore strands what seemed to be dog hair that were presence on several bodies and their clothing’s. Those specimens were all sent to the Georgia State Crime Laboratory for analysis, and technicians isolated two distinct types: a violet-colored acetate fiber and a coarse yellow-green nylon fiber with the type of trilobed qualities associated with carpets. The manufacture search was unsuccessful. The cases and discover of the fibers were showed on the news. The killer must have been watching every episode to keep up with what the police was finding out, shortly after police found bodies stripped and thrown into the river. Police thought that the killer must have thought that by throwing them into the water that it would wash away trace of evidence. The river killing was taken place at the Chatahoochee River. So police decided to do a steak out to see what they could find. On May 22, 1981, early morning hours, one of the police heard a loud splash. Leaving the river, police saw a white Chevrolet station wagon. When they pulled the car over, they learned that the driver’s name was Wayne Williams. He had indicated that he had thrown some old garbage into the water and the police let him go. After checking his story police found a 27-year-old man floating to the top. He had been dredged up about a mile from the bridge, and despite his murderer’s carefulness , a single yellow-green carpet fiber was foun... Free Essays on Trace Of Evidence Free Essays on Trace Of Evidence Trace of Evidence This article I chose was â€Å"Trace of Evidence† that was found on www.courttv.com. This article was about a serial killing taken place from 1979 to 1981 in Atlanta Georgia. Around the time of the killings, there had been found youths, more than 25 black men, some females and some as young as nine years old. They had all been strangled, bludgeoned, or asphyxiated. After police discovered these gruesome bodies they noticed that the only real clue the could notice was some kind of fiber threads and a few bore strands what seemed to be dog hair that were presence on several bodies and their clothing’s. Those specimens were all sent to the Georgia State Crime Laboratory for analysis, and technicians isolated two distinct types: a violet-colored acetate fiber and a coarse yellow-green nylon fiber with the type of trilobed qualities associated with carpets. The manufacture search was unsuccessful. The cases and discover of the fibers were showed on the news. The killer must have been watching every episode to keep up with what the police was finding out, shortly after police found bodies stripped and thrown into the river. Police thought that the killer must have thought that by throwing them into the water that it would wash away trace of evidence. The river killing was taken place at the Chatahoochee River. So police decided to do a steak out to see what they could find. On May 22, 1981, early morning hours, one of the police heard a loud splash. Leaving the river, police saw a white Chevrolet station wagon. When they pulled the car over, they learned that the driver’s name was Wayne Williams. He had indicated that he had thrown some old garbage into the water and the police let him go. After checking his story police found a 27-year-old man floating to the top. He had been dredged up about a mile from the bridge, and despite his murderer’s carefulness , a single yellow-green carpet fiber was foun...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Orientation Phase of Nursing Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words - 17

Orientation Phase of Nursing - Essay Example The stages of interpersonal relationships were initially four that include orientation, identification, exploitation, and resolution phases. However, the steps later reduced to three after further studies and analysis. The second phase now combined both the identification and exploitation phases. These two aspects combined, therefore, became known collectively as the working phase. This paper, however, only discusses the orientation phase. This is the first phase of the interpersonal process as was explained by Peplau. It is at this stage where the patient first meets the nurse. At this point, the nurse and patient are still total strangers. This first meeting always brings with it a lot of anxieties, from both the nurse and the patient. It is the nurse’s responsibility to alleviate the anxiety that grips them before proceeding any further (Boyd, 2007). This is important in establishing a therapeutic environment. Mary Boyd states that this is the session where the nurse discusses the patient’s expectations and explains the purpose of their relationship. It gives a clear definition of the roles, goals, and limitations of the relationship. In short, the nurse sets limits that have to adhere to throughout the relationship. The boundaries are however subject to flexibility depending on the situation. In practical situations where the nurse has to draft a session attendance schedule for the patient, the nurse should also spell out the guidelines on how to handle cases of missed sessions and lateness.  Ã‚   The handling should be in such a way that it alienates the patient. The nurse should understand that this could be a means by which the patient tests the relationship (Boyd, 2007). It is important to gain the patient’s acceptance and develop trust. This is achieved by maintaining consistency and continually encouraging the patient, both verbally and non-verbally, to express themselves.